Metal Oxide Glass Nanocomposites

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Download Metal Oxide Glass Nanocomposites written by Sanjib Bhattacharya in PDF format. This book is under the category Chemistry and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 128174587/9780128174586. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

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Description

Bhattacharya’s Metal Oxide Glass Nanocomposites (PDF) covers recent developments in metal oxide glass nanocomposites; including a discussion of synthesis methods; properties; characterization methods; and the most promising applications. The ebook discusses electronic and ionic conduction mechanisms of this material system with an eye towards device applications. It also provides a comprehensive review of the material’s useful properties and structure at a technical level that is appropriate for materials physicists; scientists and engineers; and chemists.

  • Reviews a wide range of the most relevant applications; such as photonics; electronic; biomedical; and thermoelectric
  • Considers the advantages and disadvantages in detail of metal oxide glass nanocomposites for utilization in key applications
  • Includes a comprehensive overview of metal oxide glass nanocomposite; including its magnetic properties; optical properties; dielectric properties; mechanical properties; electronic transport; and more

NOTE: This product only includes the ebook Metal Oxide Glass Nanocomposites in PDF.

Additional information

book-author

Sanjib Bhattacharya

publisher

Elsevier

file-type

PDF

pages

494 pages

language

English

asin

B084ZJW2J9

isbn10

128174587

isbn13

9780128174586

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover
METAL OXIDE
GLASS
NANOCOMPOSITES
Copyright
Contributors
Series editor biography
Preface to the series
Part 1: Fundamentals of metal oxide glass composites
1
Fundamentals of glasses
Introduction: Disordered solids-amorphous materials
What is glass?
Glass transition: The thermodynamics
Glass nanocomposites
Glass families: Properties and compositions
Molybdate glasses and glass nanocomposites
Selenite glasses and glass nanocomposites
Characterization techniques for glass microstructure
X-ray diffraction
Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)
Differential scanning calorimetry
FT-IR spectroscopy
Density and molar volume
Magnetic susceptibility of semiconducting samples
Correlation between structure and properties
XRD study
AgI-Ag2O-CuO glass nanocomposites
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study
Copper-molybdate glass nanocomposites
FT-IR spectroscopy study
Zincmolybdate binary glass nanocomposites
Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and EDS study
Iodo-molybdate glass nanocomposites
UV visible study
Zincmolybdate binary glass nanocomposites
Raman spectra study
Zincmolybdate binary glass nanocomposites
Conclusions
References
2
Metal oxide glass nanocomposites
Introduction
Variants of metal oxide-based glasses (heavy metal oxide glasses; fast ion conducting glasses, etc.)
Ag2O-ZnO-MoO3 system
Ag2O-CdO-CdI2 system
Ag2O-Nd2O3-MoO3 system
Ag2O-CdO-MoO3 system
Ag2O-SeO2-MoO3 system
Advantages and disadvantages of metal oxide glass nanocomposites
Comparison of metal oxide glass nanocomposites with chalcogenide glassy alloys
References
3
Features of metal oxide glass composite synthesis
Introduction
Glass-formation principles
Methods of synthesis
Melt quenching followed by heat treatment
Gel desiccation
Thermal evaporation
Sputtering
Chemical route
Template-assisted growth
Other techniques
Structural basis for glass formation
Ravaine-Souquet model
Diffusion pathway model
Random site model
Dynamic structure model
Steps of manufacturing inorganic glass
Technological approaches
References
4
Experimental tools for characterizations of glass nanocomposites containing metal oxides
Introduction
Sample preparation
Characterization techniques
XRD: Background
FT-IR spectroscopy
Ultraviolet infrared spectroscopy
Raman spectroscopy
Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM)
Transmission electron microscopy
Electrical and dielectric property measurement
DC conductivity measurement
AC conductivity measurement
Dielectric property measurement
References
Part 2: Features of metal oxide glass composite properties
5
Mechanical properties of oxide glassy nanocomposites
Introduction
Mechanical properties of glass-nanocomposites
Hardness measurement
Various hardness testing methods
Static indentation test
Scratch tests
Plowing test
Rebound test
Damping test
Cutting test
Abrasion test
Erosion test
Microhardness measurement
Vickers microhardness
Shear modulus
Yield stress
Knoop microhardness
Young’s modulus
Experimental details
Results and discussion
Vickers microhardness analysis
Copper molybdate glass-nanocomposites
Vickers hardness
Shear modulus
Yield stress
Selenite glass-nanocomposites
Vickers hardness
Shear modulus
Yield stress
AgI-Ag2O-CuO glass-nanocomposites (AACGNC)
Vickers hardness
Shear modulus
Yield stress
Silver-zinc-cadmium-vanadate glass-nanocomposites
Vickers hardness
Shear modulus
Yield stress
Zinc molybdate binary glass-nanocomposites
Vickers hardness
Shear modulus
Yield stress
Variation of Vickers microhardness (Hv), shear modulus (G), and yield stress (σy) of some glass-nanocomposites
Knoop microhardness
Copper molybdate glass-nanocomposites (CMGNC)
Knoop hardness
Young’s modulus
Selenite glass-nanocomposites
Knoop hardness
Young’s modulus
AgI-Ag2O-CuO glass-nanocomposites
Knoop hardness
Young’s modulus
Silver-zinc-cadmium-vanadate glass-nanocomposites
Knoop hardness
Young’s modulus
Zinc molybdate binary glass-nanocomposites
Knoop hardness
Young’s modulus
Power law analysis on the basis of Vickers microhardness data
Indentation size effect (ISE) and reverse indentation size effect (RISE)
Conclusions
References
6
Microhardness of some glassy nanocomposites
Introduction
Experimental procedure
Results and discussion
Mechanical microhardness
Theoretical models of microhardness values for validating indentation size effect (ISE) nature
Meyer’s law
Proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model
Conclusion
References
7
Features of chemical properties of metal oxide glass nanocomposites
Introduction
Glass
Concept of nanocomposites
Oxide glasses
Classification of oxide glasses
Effect of composition on glass properties
Conclusion
References
8
Electron and ion transport in metal oxide glass composites
Introduction
Background of the work
Review work of some metal oxide glasses
Different theories on electrical conduction mechanisms in metal oxide glasses
Small polaron and large polaron hopping
Adiabatic and nonadiabatic hopping process
Electrical conduction in noncrystalline materials
Molecular crystal model
J. Schnakenberg’s model
D. Emin’s model
Triberis and Friedman’s model
N.F. Mott’s variable-range hopping model
G.N. Greaves’s model
Jump-relaxation model
Almond-West formalism
A.K. Jonscher universal power law
Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) relation
Quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT)
Nonoverlapping small polaron tunneling (NSPT)
Correlated barrier hopping (CBH)
Overlapping large polaron tunneling (OLPT)
Classical hopping model: Hopping over a barrier (HOB)
Impedance spectroscopy
References
9
Frequency dependent conductivity of some vanadate glassy system
Introduction
Experimental procedure
Results and discussions
Conclusion
References
10
Electrical transport of some ionic glass-nanocomposites
Introduction
Experimental
Results and discussion
Conclusion
References
11
DC and AC conductivity of some lithium ion conducting glassy nanocomposites
Introduction
What is an ion-conducting glass nanocomposite?
Molybdate glass nanocomposites
Selenite glass nanocomposites
Theory of ion conduction and relaxation in glass nanocomposites
AC relaxation
Experimental procedure
Results and discussions
DC conductivity
AC conductivity
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
12
Dielectric properties of oxide glass composites
Introduction
General consideration of dielectric relaxation
High-k dielectrics
Experimental procedures
Results and discussion
Dielectric studies
Electric modulus formulation
Conclusion
References
Part 3: Applications of metal oxide glass composites
13
Electrodes
Requirements to electrodes in electronic devices
Broadly, electrodes are classified in two main parts
The types of electrodes
Advantages of metal oxide glass composites as electrodes
Brief introduction about metal oxide glass composites
Advantages of using metal oxide glass composites over fossil fuels
Materials acceptable for application with parameters
Nanosized transition-metal oxides as negative electrode materials for lithium ion batteries
Positive electrode materials for lithium ion batteries
Graphene/metal oxide composite electrode materials for energy storage
Electrode materials for sodium-ion batteries
Metal oxide electrode materials for electrochemical supercapacitors
Mostly needed parameters
References
14
Photonics
Introduction
Waveguides
Materials
Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, Y3Al5O12) GC nanocomposites
Willemite (Zn2SiO4) GC nanocomposites
Oxyhalide GC nanocomposites
Conclusion
References
15
Biomedical applications
Introduction
Materials used for biomedical applications
Biomedical polymers reinforced with clay-based silicate nanoparticles
Polymer silicate nanocomposite hydrogels with biomedical potential
Polymer-layered silicate nanocomposite developments for drug delivery applications
Polymer/bioactive glass nanocomposites
Advantages of nanocomposites for biomedical applications
Conclusion
References
16
Metal oxide glass fibers
Materials
What are glass fibers?
Heavy metal oxide glass holey fibers
Chalcogenide glass fibers for mid-infrared transmission
Tellurite glasses
References
17
Other applications
Introduction
Material
Experimental
Preparation of metal oxide nanocomposites
Different methods of preparation of metal oxide nanocomposites
Melt-quenching technique
Properties of glasses
Mechanical properties
Electrical properties
Optical properties
Applications of metal oxide glass nanocomposites
References
Index
Back Cover

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