The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems

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Download The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems written by George J. Dimitrakopoulos, Lorna Uden, Iraklis Varlamis in PDF format. This book is under the category Communication and bearing the isbn/isbn13 number 128182814/9780128182819. You may reffer the table below for additional details of the book.

Description

The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems (PDF) considers ITS from three perspectives: business models; users; and policy/regulation. Topics cover in-vehicle applications; such as autonomous driving; vehicle-to-vehicle/vehicle-to-infrastructure communication; and related applications; such as personalized mobility. The ebook also examines ITS technology enablers; such as wireless communication; sensing technologies; user behavior as part of the transportation chain; computational technology; regulations; policies; and standards affecting ITS; financial models that influence ITS; and the future of ITS applications. Users will find a holistic approach to the most recent technological advances and the future spectrum of mobility.

  • Integrates coverage of personalized mobility and digital assistants; big data analytics and autonomous driving
  • Systematically presents the whole spectrum of next-generation Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) technologies
  • Includes end-of-chapter; open-ended questions that trigger thinking on the technological; managerial and regulatory aspects of ITS

NOTE: This only includes the ebook The Future of Intelligent Transport Systems in PDF. No access codes included.

Additional information

book-author

George J. Dimitrakopoulos, Lorna Uden, Iraklis Varlamis

publisher

Elsevier

file-type

PDF

pages

243 pages

language

English

asin

B084ZKBBSD

isbn10

128182814

isbn13

9780128182819

Table of contents


Table of contents :
Cover
TitleThe Future of Intelligent
Transport Systems
Copyright
Introduction
Part I: ITs Technology enablers
Chapter 1 – Sensing and perception systems for ITS
1.1 – Introduction: highly automated vehicles and the importance of perception
1.2 – Driver’s sensor configurations and sensor fusion
1.3 – Small, affordable, and robust LIDAR sensors will enable highly automated vehicles
1.4 – RADAR
1.5 – Fail-operational E/E architectures
References
Chapter 2 – Communication advances
2.1 – Why vehicular communications?
2.2 – Types (modes) of vehicular communications
2.3 – Cellular V2X (C-V2X) and the case of 5G
2.4 – Wireless access for vehicular environments (WAVE) and its migration toward IEEE 802.11p
2.4.1 Safety-related applications
2.4.2 Traffic-management applications
2.4.3 User-comfort and infotainment applications
2.5 – IEEE 1609 family of standards
2.6 – SAE J2735
2.7 – LED-enabled visible light communications (IEEE TG 802.15.7)
2.8 – Bluetooth
2.9 – ETSI and CEN standards for V2X communications
2.10 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 3 – Computing technologies: platforms, processors, and controllers
3.1 – Introduction to modern automotive high-performance computing platforms
3.2 – Consequences for vehicular electrical/electronic (E/E) architectures
3.3 – Solution approaches for automotive eHPC platform
3.3.1 – Overview
3.3.2 – RISC-V extensions for real-time computing
3.3.3 – Monitoring and throttling capabilities of real-time flows
3.3.4 – Automotive eHPC software environment
3.3.5 – Vehicle software requirements
References
Part II: ITs users
Chapter 4 – User requirements and preferences for ITS
4.1 – Requirements engineering
4.2 – Requirements elicitation
4.3 – Requirement elicitation techniques
4.3.1 – Traditional techniques
4.3.2 – Collaborative techniques
4.3.3 – Contextual techniques
4.3.4 – Cognitive techniques
4.4 – Problems in ITS requirements elicitation
4.5 – Potential solutions for ITS requirements elicitation
4.6 – Contextual, social, and dynamic requirements elicitation
4.7 – Activity theory
4.7.1 – Brief review of activity theory
4.7.2 – Benefits of activity theory for ITS requirements elicitations
Questions
References
Chapter 5 – Co-creation of value for user experiences
5.1 – Design for users
5.1.1 – Empathy
5.1.2 – Experience
5.2 – User experience (UX)
5.2.1 – The difference between UX and UI design
5.3 – User experience design (UXD or UED)
5.3.1 – The quadrant model
5.3.2 – User experience design process
5.3.3 – The why, what and how of UX design
5.4 – Co-creation of value
5.5 – Design ITS user experience model
5.5.1 – Products connected with purpose
5.5.2 – A holistic and collaborative approach should be taken
5.5.3 – Identify all stakeholders involved
5.5.4 – Define user value propositions
5.5.5 – Understanding user requirements
5.5.6 – Understand user mental model
5.5.6.1 – User Personas
5.5.7 – Develop conceptual model
5.5.8 – Cocreation of value
Questions
References
Chapter 6 – ITS and their users: classification and behavior
6.1 – Introduction and classifications
6.2 – Impact of the development of ITS on driver behavior
6.3 – Impact of the development of ITS to travelers and road users
6.4 – Impact of the development of ITS on transportation professionals
6.5 – Impact of the development of ITS on local residents and businesses
6.6 – Impact of the development of ITS on vulnerable road users (VRUs)
6.7 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 7 – User acceptance and ethics of ITS
7.1 – Overview of user acceptance of highly automated vehicles
7.2 – Technology acceptance and related models
7.3 – Ethical issues related to highly automated vehicles
References
Part III: ITs business models
Chapter 8 – ITS and economic growth: investment, stakeholders, and relations
8.1 – Introductory definitions related to economic growth
8.2 – Investments in ITS
8.3 – ITS investments planning
8.4 – Stakeholders, relations, and strategies
8.5 – Barriers
8.6 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 9 – Impact of ITS advances on the industry
9.1 – Introduction
9.2 – Increasing levels of human-centered automation in ITS will drive the worldwide economy
9.3 – Evolution of safety and reliability requirements with increasing automation
9.4 – ITS key targets to strengthen European and worldwide industry and its competitiveness
9.5 – Artificial intelligence (AI) is the basis for cognitive, human-centered ITS
9.6 – Generating user acceptance by functional-safe algorithms and methodologies for ITS
9.7 – Impact on growth and sustainability by compliance for intelligent transport decision systems, Standards
9.8 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 10 – ITS business and revenue models
10.1 – Business model is important
10.2 – Business model definition
10.3 – Components of a business model
10.4 – Types of business models
10.5 – Business model canvas
10.6 – Revenue model
10.6.1 – Business model versus revenue model versus revenue stream
10.7 – Types of revenue models
Markup
Commission
Rent/lease
Advertising
Licensing
Interest
Subscription
Donation
Arbitrage
Fee-for-service
10.8 – Why we need a business model?
10.9 – Value creation
10.10 – Cocreation
10.11 – Value cocreation business models
Questions
References
Chapter 11 – ITS and marketing
Abstract
Keywords
11.1 – Overview
11.2 – Exploiting ITS solutions
11.3 – Marketing ITS solutions in the automotive market
11.3.1 Market potential—OEM point of view
11.3.2 Market potential—supplier point of view
11.3.3 Market potential—technology/engineering/tool providers point of view
11.4 – Marketing strategies for ITS solution providers
11.4.1 – Overview and phases
11.4.1.1 – Initial phase
11.4.1.2 – Inception phase
11.4.1.3 – Implementation phase
11.4.1.4 – Monitoring and improvement phase
11.5 Conclusions
References
Chapter 12 – The societal impact of ITS
12.1 Introduction
12.2 – Smart mobility
12.2.1 – Overview
12.2.2 – Enhancements in traffic safety
12.2.3 – Accessibility and capacity of traffic
12.2.4 – Comfort and enabling of user’s freedom
12.2.5 – Sustainability, energy efficiency, and environment
12.2.6 – Social inclusion and mobility for all
12.3 – Employment
12.3.1 – Educational impact and IP valorization in the EU
12.3.2 – Impact on employment
12.4 – Conclusions
References
Part IV: ITs regulations, policies and standards
Chapter 13 – ITS and sustainability
13.1 – Sustainability
13.1.1 – Why sustainability is important
13.1.2 – The pillars of sustainability
13.1.2.1 – The environmental pillar
13.1.2.2 – The social pillar
13.1.2.3 – The economic pillar
13.2 – Sustainable transportation
13.2.1 – Sustainable transport
13.2.2 – Why sustainable transport is important
13.3 – Intelligent transport systems (ITS)
13.3.1 – Implementing sustainable ITS
13.3.2 – Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans
13.4 – Why we need to have sustainable ITS
13.5 – Sustainable development goals for ITS
Questions
References
Chapter 14 – ITS standardization bodies and standards
14.1 – World-level standardization bodies
14.2 – Continental or national standardization bodies
14.3 – An overview of ITS-related standards
14.4 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 15 – ITS programs and strategies worldwide
15.1 – International strategies for ITS
15.2 – ITS programs
15.3 – Socio and technoeconomic aspects of ITS
References
Part V: The future of ITs applications
Chapter 16 – Transportation network applications
16.1 – Introduction
16.2 – Network management systems
16.2.1 – Driving-assistance systems
Collision avoidance applications
Information mediation
Traffic efficiency applications
16.2.2 – Network operation applications
16.2.2.1 – Product transport and logistics
16.2.2.2 – Network traffic and safety management
16.2.2.3 – Smart urban transportation systems
16.2.2.4 – More transportation-related applications
16.2.3 – The future of transportation network applications
References
Chapter 17 – Autonomous driving levels and enablers
17.1 – Autonomous driving levels
17.2 – Technology enablers
17.2.1 – Beyond technology enablers
17.3 – Research areas
References
Chapter 18 – Intelligent transport systems and smart mobility
18.1 – Introduction
18.2 – Sustainable smart mobility
18.3 – The future of smart mobility and the open challenges
References
Chapter 19 – Big data analytics for intelligent transportation systems
19.1 – Introduction
19.2 – Data collection
19.2.1 – In road networks
19.2.2 – Within smartcities
19.2.3 – In maritime networks
19.2.4 – In air transportation networks
19.3 – Big data analytics
19.3.1 – Smart cities and road networks
19.3.2 – Smart cities and crowd analytics
19.3.3 – Maritime network analytics
19.3.4 – Aircraft analytics
19.4 – Big data processing systems for intelligent transportation
References
Chapter 20 – Personalized mobility services and AI
20.1 – Artificial intelligence in transportation
20.2 – Smart mobility services
20.3 – Conclusions and open issues
References
Chapter 21 – Integrated mobility for smart cities
21.1 – Introduction
21.2 – Smart mobility applications
21.3 – Benefits and challenges
21.4 – The future of Integrated Mobility
21.4.1 – The new features
21.4.2 – Use cases
21.4.3 – The effects
21.5 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 22 – Intelligent transportation systems and blockchain technology
22.1 – Blockchain technology basics and applications
22.2 – Ethereum blockchain and smart contracts
22.3 – An ITS-oriented blockchain model
22.4 – Conclusions
References
Chapter 23 – Conclusions and way forward
23.1 – The future of ITS
23.2 – The upcoming trends
Index
Back Cover

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